Notices

The 16th Biennial Labour History Conference 2019

ASSLH’s next big conference will be held 3 to 5 October 2019 at the CFMEU Office (Old Trades Hall), Beaufort Street, Perth, WA.

Full details, including a call for papers, will appear soon.

For further information, please contact the conference convener, Associate Professor Bobbie Oliver (bobbie.oliver@uwa.edu.au).

 

OUT NOW

Labour History, no. 114 (May 2018)

In articles that range from early colonial New South Wales and Tasmania/Van Diemen’s Land to twentieth-century New Zealand, the May issue demonstrates the scope and depth of labour history.

Publishing our previous issue as a book has meant we have increased the size of this one. We have more than the usual number of book reviews, and we include a report on the 15th Biennial Labour History Conference, held at the University of Queensland in September 2017. Click here for the table of contents and abstracts.

Labour History in Transition

We have just formed a partnership with Liverpool University Press, who will help us to maintain the quality of Labour History and enhance its profile, marketing and audience reach. This will secure the future of the journal for at least the next five years. All editorial arrangements will stay the same, and the cost of individual subscriptions will remain unchanged. For more details, click here.

Working Women and Gendered Labour

A Call for Papers for a special issue of Labour History.

We invite contributions on all aspects of women’s work, waged and unwaged, in the formal or informal economies, in “traditional” or “non-traditional” occupations. We also welcome gender history perspectives examining the historical constructions of masculinities and/or femininities in the workplace.

To submit a paper for consideration and double-blind peer review, please email Carl Power (admin@labourhistory.org.au). Deadline 1 October 2018.

Click here for more information. For any questions related to the Special Issue, please contact the editors, Professor Glenda Strachan (g.strachan@griffith.edu.au) or Dr Emma Robertson (emma.robertson@latrobe.edu.au).

The Toll from Toil Revisited: Historical Lessons in Workplace Health and Safety

In 1970, the West Gate Bridge collapsed during construction. This memorial park commemorates the 35 lives lost.

A Call for Papers for a special issue of Labour History (May 2020).

In 1997, Labour History published a special issue of occupational health and safety scholarship, grounded in an ongoing concern that workers, their families, and their communities pay a heavy price for workforce participation – the toll from toil. The aim of the special issue was to demonstrate that labour history scholarship can make a valuable contribution to understanding of occupational health and safety problems in the workplace. Twenty years on, the growth of “new” forms of work organisation prompts a similar urgency to maintain our commitment to critical research that can help to promote safety at work.

Deadline for submission: 1 August 2019.

To submit a paper for consideration and double-blind peer review, please email Carl Power (admin@labourhistory.org.au).

Click here for more information. If you have any questions, please contact the editors, Professor Michael Quinlan (m.quinlan@unsw.edu.au) or Dr Sarah Gregson (s.gregson@unsw.edu.au).

Merv Flanagan Appeal

Merv Flanagan’s Funeral

The Unions NSW 1917 Strike Committee has launched an online appeal for funds to restore the Rookwood Cemetery headstone of Merv Flanagan, the striking carter who was murdered by an armed strike-breaker during the Great Strike. Funds raised will be used to honour Merv’s legacy and that of all those who participated in the Great Strike. Click here for more information.

The 1917 Strike Show!

The 1917 Strike show was put together by P. P. Cranney and Christina Mimmocchi and tells the story of the Great Strike in words and song.

Performed throughout 2017, a recording is now available on CD by contacting Christina Mimmocchi (christinapossum@bigpond.com).

Click here to see a clip of a song from the show.

Humphrey McQueen, “Dr Marx, Professor Childe and Manure: Some Rather Crude Materialism”

The 2017 V. Gordon Childe Memorial Lecture

“Childe … made a reputation digging through the ‘revolting quantity of refuse’ from past civilisations. To illustrate that we acquire our human nature through social evolution, he offers this instance of historical materialism: ‘The human infant has to learn from parents and seniors how to talk, how to dispose of his excrement, what to eat and how to prepare it, and so on.’ These rude facts serve as a lead into … Childe the man, his career and the manner of death.”

Click here for a transcript of the lecture.

The History of the Australian Minimum Wage

Written by Reg Hamilton, this work brings together, probably for the first time, the  Australian Basic Wage, National Wage and Safety Net decisions of the last 100 years, together with each of the movements in the Australian minimum wage. Click here to download the paper.

The decisions and orders that established and varied the Australian minimum wage are now available online and can be accessed here from the Fair Work Commission website.

Greg Patmore, Worker Voice: Employee Representation in the Workplace in Australia, Canada, Germany, the UK and the US 1914–1939

This book informs debates about worker participation in the workplace by analysing comparative historical data relating to these ideas during the inter-war period in Australia, Canada, Germany, the UK and the US. The issue is topical because of the contemporary shift to a workplace focus in many countries without a corresponding development of infrastructure at the workplace level, and because of the growing “representation gap” as union membership declines. Click here for more information.